Celebrating Female Artists - International Women's Day
March 08, 2022

Lee Krasner, Palingenesis, 1971 (detail)
© Pollock-Krasner Foundation/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

This International Women’s Day we have collated a list of female artists that we would like to appreciate. There are so many incredible female artists out there so it was tough to whittle down. Here are a few we managed to select and we hope you enjoy reading a bit about them.

 

This International Women’s Day we have collated a list of female artists that we would like to appreciate.

This International Women’s Day we have collated a list of female artists that we would like to appreciate. There are so many incredible female artists out there so it was tough to whittle down. Here are a few we managed to select and we hope you enjoy reading a bit about them.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama is a contemporary Japanese artist who works across a variety of arts/mediums from painting, sculpture, film and installation. Kusama voluntarily lives and has lived in a psychiatric hospital for the last forty years. She was haunted by very vivid hallucinations as a child or as she calls them depersonalisations. She would often draw these as a way of processing what was going on in her mind. 

Her works and projects progressed over the years and had a somewhat obsessive nature. From the repetitive dots, pumpkins and mirrors, she has a particular fascination with specifics within her work. She is hugely successful in today's society as her exhibitions have had huge success as a result of the social media landscape that thrives in the present day. 

Bridget Riley

Riley was born in London and spent most of her upbringing in Cornwall and Lincolnshire. Her initial works were paintings of objects in a semi-impressionist manner. She then moved to pointillism of which her main subjects were landscapes. In 1960, she then went on to develop a style that explored the dynamic potentialities of optical phenomena.

Riley had studied art and later went on to become a teacher within various art schools within the UK. She also won a variety of awards within her career, including the AICA Critics Prize in 1963. She also exhibited in a variety of galleries. 

Fiona Rae

Fiona Rae was born in Hong Kong in 1963. She studied art from the years of 1983-87 and later went on to have an incredibly prosperous career. In 2003, Fiona was commissioned to create for a BBC Broadcasting House Public Art Programme. In 2011, she was Appointed Professor of Painting for the Royal Academy Schools, London, UK. Furthermore, Fiona was commissioned by Royal Mail to design a stamp to celebrate the 250th anniversary of Royal Academy of Arts

Fiona has had an incredibly successful career and these are just a few of the selected highlights!

Anni Albers

Anni Albers was born in Berlin, Germany. In 1922, she joined the Bauhaus group and participated in the school's weaving workshop. She received her diploma in weaving in 1930. However, her Bauhaus dream was short lived as the Nazis pressurised the school to close in early 1930s. She and her husband fled to America where they taught for a while. In 1949, Anni Albers held her first retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. This was the first solo exhibition to be dedicated to a textile artist at the institution so a very important career marker. 

Albers progressed the modernisation of weaving through art, design and architecture. Later in her career she also got into printmaking, using various influences from the places she visited and the things she saw.

Lee Krasner

Lee Krasner was born in 1908 to Russian-Jewish refugees in Brooklyn. Krasner was initially a mural painter for the Works Progress Administration and an arts activist. She later went on to study with Hans Hoffman and she joined the American Artists Abstract Group. She was very much at the center of the New York art world that was developing. 

Krasner aided the development of Jackson Pollock by introducing him to a variety of influential artists. In the years after Pollock's death, Krasner’s work expanded with energy and scale. Nature became a large focus of her works.

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